For Winter Survival, Rum, Soup, and Yoga

After digging out (again) yesterday, I needed something to warm up. Enter Sweet, Spiked, and Spicy Hot Chocolate and Chicken Kai Pa Lo.

 

snow angel

My snow angel

 

As usual, I made a couple modifications to the recipes. For the hot chocolate, I subbed Nutella for peanut butter. Really, who wouldn’t?? I also prefer whipped cream to marshmallows on my hot chocolate, and I didn’t have sea salt. Nonetheless, it was a nice treat.

Key to the chicken kai pa lo is the soft-boiled egg. I didn’t fully appreciate the wonder of a good soft-boiled egg until a vacation to Hawaii and one of the most memorable meals of my life at Lucky Belly. There I had the Beast Bowl, a phenomenal bowl of ramen with brisket, short ribs, oxtail, and of course, a soft-boiled egg. My mouth waters just thinking of it and the pork belly bao I had with it… anyway back to my dinner last night. The broth was delicious and topped with jasmine rice and the egg – yum! I also sprinkled some sesame seeds on top. A tutorial to make the perfect soft-boiled egg can be found here.

This morning, I’m recovering from all that shoveling with some yoga to stretch the muscles I used and hoping for the end of the snow this winter. Namaste.

Kitchen Adventures: Brinner

I haven’t had a good brunch (any brunch, really) in a while, which is just a shame. The thing I like most about brunch is that I get to indulge my sweet and salty cravings in the same meal. To make up for my lack of brunching, I did brinner (breakfast for dinner) last night. The centerpiece of brinner was a veggie quiche, made with sautéed onions, spinach, piquillo peppers, and (my personal favorite ingredient) goat cheese, with some herbs de provence for a little extra flavor. I have obtained neither the patience nor the tools to make homemade pie crusts just yet, so I used a pre-made crust. The quiche still turned out great and would’ve been even better with a flaky, hand-made crust. Served alongside a stack of fluffy, chocolate chip buttermilk pancakes and crispy bacon (because what’s breakfast without bacon), this meal satisfied my brunch needs.

 

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My vintage-looking quiche (pre-made crust notwithstanding)

Resilience

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A Google images search of “resilience” will yield various pictures reflecting the meaning of the word, perhaps most commonly the image above. These images reflect the idea that resilience is about growing despite adversity or the ability to bounce back. As I shoveled snow this morning, something I haven’t done in several years and had dreaded doing upon my move out of the South, I thought that perhaps my personal image of resilience would be something like the red ivy and green berries or glistening blacktop that poked out in patches from under the snow. Or perhaps just me standing triumphantly atop a mound of snow I had shoveled. (I really dislike cold and snowy weather.) What I also noticed is that if I stopped thinking about how much I hate being cold and instead noticed how beautiful the white, powdery snow was, how it looked as though glitter or diamonds had been sprinkled in with it, it actually was kind of nice. If I checked in on my emotions, I really wasn’t terribly upset to be outside. Also, it provided an excellent workout.

Winter weather is not a serious adversity to overcome, but I have learned through other personal and professional experience that mindfulness and a handful of other practices can be helpful in facing stressful conditions and building resilience. The American Psychological Association offers 10 ways to build resilience, including keeping things in perspective (for me this morning, it was the first real snow of the season and much less than people in other parts of the country have had to deal with; also, it was a powdery snow, much easier to shovel than a heavier, wet snow) and maintaining a positive outlook (bonus workout today!). Also important is staying positive about your abilities to deal with the stressor, particularly when based on how you have handled other stressors in the past. When I have experienced professional setbacks, I have taken time to reflect upon the problem-solving skills that I developed through years of school, then used that critical thinking to find solutions to the problem or reframe the stressor (sometimes there is a silver lining to be found). Less focused on reflecting on the past or reframing the present situation, mindfulness also can help cultivate resilience by encouraging acceptance (seeing the situation for what it is, without the emotional baggage), self-compassion, and cognitive flexibility.

People generally are resilient, whether with major life changes or everyday stressors (including snow storms). Keeping our own resilience in mind often is the first step in tapping into our resources to deal with challenges.