Resilience

resilience17

A Google images search of “resilience” will yield various pictures reflecting the meaning of the word, perhaps most commonly the image above. These images reflect the idea that resilience is about growing despite adversity or the ability to bounce back. As I shoveled snow this morning, something I haven’t done in several years and had dreaded doing upon my move out of the South, I thought that perhaps my personal image of resilience would be something like the red ivy and green berries or glistening blacktop that poked out in patches from under the snow. Or perhaps just me standing triumphantly atop a mound of snow I had shoveled. (I really dislike cold and snowy weather.) What I also noticed is that if I stopped thinking about how much I hate being cold and instead noticed how beautiful the white, powdery snow was, how it looked as though glitter or diamonds had been sprinkled in with it, it actually was kind of nice. If I checked in on my emotions, I really wasn’t terribly upset to be outside. Also, it provided an excellent workout.

Winter weather is not a serious adversity to overcome, but I have learned through other personal and professional experience that mindfulness and a handful of other practices can be helpful in facing stressful conditions and building resilience. The American Psychological Association offers 10 ways to build resilience, including keeping things in perspective (for me this morning, it was the first real snow of the season and much less than people in other parts of the country have had to deal with; also, it was a powdery snow, much easier to shovel than a heavier, wet snow) and maintaining a positive outlook (bonus workout today!). Also important is staying positive about your abilities to deal with the stressor, particularly when based on how you have handled other stressors in the past. When I have experienced professional setbacks, I have taken time to reflect upon the problem-solving skills that I developed through years of school, then used that critical thinking to find solutions to the problem or reframe the stressor (sometimes there is a silver lining to be found). Less focused on reflecting on the past or reframing the present situation, mindfulness also can help cultivate resilience by encouraging acceptance (seeing the situation for what it is, without the emotional baggage), self-compassion, and cognitive flexibility.

People generally are resilient, whether with major life changes or everyday stressors (including snow storms). Keeping our own resilience in mind often is the first step in tapping into our resources to deal with challenges.

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