Mental Health Month

May is Mental Health Month, and Mental Health America is focusing their campaign this year, B4Stage4, on encouraging screening and early intervention. They propose that with earlier identification and intervention, mental illness can be treated more effectively, preventing its progression and ultimately lowering disease burden and health care costs. Though the USPSTF recommends routine depression screening only in the cases where mental health supports and follow-up are readily available (by having psychologists or other mental health providers integrated into primary care clinics, for example) and doesn’t make a recommendation for routine screening for suicidal thoughts, the MHA campaign promotes a new way of thinking about prevention and treatment of mental illness that is more aligned with how we think about prevention and treatment of physical illnesses such as cancer (though this dichotomy assumes that mental and physical illness are two separate things, when many times they are closely intertwined). With 50 percent of Americans meeting criteria for some mental illness during their lifetime, any prevention and treatment efforts are crucial. Below are two of my favorite Ted talks on mental health.

Advertisements

Perspective

I struggled with what I wanted to express with this post, and I still don’t have a fully developed comment for it. However, I felt it important to share the powerful Ted talks I watched recently that provide another perspective to the social commentary that has been swelling around our troubled criminal justice system and the protests, riots, and general emotional reactions to what has been playing out on the national news in the past few months. So much of what I have read and heard has been from the viewpoint of people with privilege, something I acknowledge I share, the privilege of growing up in a safe neighborhood, with a supportive family, guaranteed an education. But our social justice problems cannot be understood and cannot be addressed from this perspective; we have to understand things from the “other” point of view. For now, I will leave the videos here and perhaps write more later. In the meantime, I will hope that we start to open our eyes to the cultural changes that must take place to allow underprivileged individuals the same fair shot at the American dream that has been sold to us all.